Fulling Mill Nymphs

 

Standard Nymph Patterns

 

Copper John

Copper John

A best-selling general purpose, slim-bodied nymph suitable for imitating a whole range of natural food items on which trout feed, with the addition of a brass bead to help get down to feeding fish.

Order Code Size
189312 12
189314 14
189316 16

Group 2

Cruncher Original

Cruncher Original

This is the original best selling Cruncher pattern, a lightweight slow sinking nymph pattern that is highly effective for targeting stillwater trout. It can be used on any line from floating to fast sink.

Order Code Size
15612 12

Group 1

Czech Nymph - Hare's Ear

Czech Nymph - Hare's Ear

Czech nymphs have dominated the river competition scene over the last few years. With their slim profile and fast sinking dressing they are a highly effective pattern when targeting deep feeding trout in rivers.

Order Code Size
83810 10
83812 12

Group 2

Czech Nymph - Olive

Czech Nymph - Olive

Czech nymphs have dominated the river competition scene over the last few years. With their slim profile and fast sinking dressing they are a highly effective pattern when targeting deep feeding trout in rivers.

Order Code Size
SM10010 10
SM10012 12

Group 2

Flashback Pheasant Tail - Gold Bead

Flashback Pheasant Tail - Gold Bead

The addition of a gold bead to get the fly deep and a pearlescent flashback make this a useful stalking pattern for both rivers and stillwaters. A best seller.

Order Code Size
189712 12
189714 14
189716 16

Group 2

Flashback Pheasant Tail - Gold Tungsten Bead

Flashback Pheasant Tail - Gold Tungsten Bead

The addition of a gold tungsten bead, as well as a crystal hair tail and pearlescent flashback mean that this fly gets right down to fish in deep pools or fast water and grabs their attention.

Order Code Size
109812 12
109814 14
109816 16

Group 3

Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear - Natural

Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear - Natural

The best selling classic Hare's Ear nymph, unweighted so it can be fished slowly around weed beds without catching the bottom. A great general pattern that catches fish the world over.

Order Code Size
167012 12
167014 14
167016 16

Group 1

Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear - Natural - Gold Bead

Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear - Natural - Gold Bead

The Hares Ear nymph is a great general pattern that catches many fish the world over on both still and running water. The addition of a gold bead allows the angler to reach deeper water.

Order Code Size
162112 12
162114 14

Group 2

Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear - Black - Tungsten Bead

Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear - Black - Tungsten Bead

A best seller. A simple, dark, generic nymph featuring a large tungsten bead at the head to help get your fly right deep down to feeding fish.

Order Code Size
82612 12
82614 14

Group 3

Living Damsel - Dark Olive

Living Damsel - Dark Olive

The Living Damsel nymph imitation is tied with a realistic looking extended body and weighted eyes, the weight at the head gives it a strike-inducing undulating movement when retrieved.

Order Code Size
245110 10
245112 12

Group 2

March Brown Nymph

March Brown Nymph

March Browns are an important food source for river trout, but this simple dark nymph is an ideal general purpose pattern suitable for imitating a whole host of natural food items that trout feed on.

Order Code Size
35112 12
35114 14

Group 1

Mayfly Micro Nymph

Mayfly Micro Nymph

The Mayfly Micro covers smaller mayfly species and also some of the larger Pale Olives, a good general purpose small nymph pattern suitable for imitating a whole range of food items.

Order Code Size
244712 12
244714 14
244716 16

Group 2

Murrumbidgee Nymph

Murrumbidgee Nymph

Philip Weigall looks back on this effective nymph -

It was the late 1980s. My river nymph fishing success rate was taking off and I visited the Compleat Angler (then located in McKillop St, Melbourne) to stock up on some more patterns. Back then Rick Dobson worked behind the counter in the flyfishing area and he showed me some nymphs with a reddish-brown body and a prominent black wing-case. Rick explained that an obvious, even exaggerated wing-case was a powerful trigger for feeding trout, as it suggested the vulnerable pre-emergence stage in a mayfly’s lifecycle. 

Filled with the confidence that Rick had passed on so effectively, I headed to Jim Crow Creek to take the new nymphs for a swim. In a word, they were dynamite. In fact, they were so good that before long I was fishing nothing else – literally. Just a single nymph on a 10 or 12 foot leader, fished back a little faster than the current while I watched the fly line ‘bridge’ for any slight lifting. Over the next few months, trout in the Howqua, Delatite and St Georges rivers all fell to the nymph with no name, and by the dozen.   

As time went by I gradually returned to dry fly or streamer fishing when conditions demanded, but whenever a nymph was called for, the black and reddish brown one from the Compleat Angler was it. Then one day, I was down to just a couple of nymphs and I called into the store for a resupply. However to my alarm, there weren’t any left in stock and the new staff member couldn’t shed any light on the origin of the fly I was looking for. He showed me some other brown nymphs with similar specifications, but even to my slightly colour-challenged vision, none had quite the same look.

Then a short time later, I was sent some packets of dubbing to review by the late Mike Spry and one was labelled ‘Murrumbidgee Brown.’ To my relief, this dubbing looked identical to the reddish-brown of the Compleat Angler originals, a sole survivor of which I still had in my box. Copying this survivor, I was able to tie up some nymphs and at last I had a pattern to fish that largely matched the original – albeit a little rougher thanks to my very average tying skills. By now I had become more broad-minded about nymphs almost by necessity, but it was a relief to have a good supply of ‘old faithful’ once again. (When that single packet from Mike Spry ran out, some kind fly tying friends – most recently the late Muz Wilson – were able to keep me supplied with dubbing blends they copied from the original.)

At this stage I was calling the fly the ‘Murrumbidgee Brown Nymph’ by way of distinction from other brown nymphs, and the next memorable episode occurred not on a river, but a lake. I was fishing O’Neills Bay, Lake Eucumbene with friends Tony Wilson and Ian Taylor. It was March and although the lake was a good height and temperature and we were catching some great fishing before sunrise and after sunset on Craigs Nighttimes and Black Muddlers, the daytime pickings were slim. I don’t have the slightest idea why (Eucumbene is not renowned as a mayfly lake) but for some reason, on the second day I tied on single size 14 Murrumbidgee Brown Nymph and began to fish it very slowly through the shallow areas of the bay. In no time I had a pair of 3 pound browns. I raced around the point to call Ian and Tony over, then raced back to my spot. By the time my friends arrived breathlessly, I was into another brownie. In response to the obvious question I replied, “Size 14 brown nymph, fished slow.“

To cut a long story, I kept catching fish while Ian and Tony caught nothing. I swapped spots, watched their retrieves to make sure they were the same as mine… nothing. Finally, in desperation, I gave them each a Murrumbidgee Brown Nymph. The nymphs they had been using were similar, just a bit darker brown, so surely it couldn’t be the fly that was making the difference? But it was. Within a short time Ian and Tony each caught a couple of good trout on my nymphs before the bay finally went quiet.

As someone who usually rates presentation over fly selection, that episode at O’Neills Bay remains one of the most striking examples in my flyfishing life of how important an exact pattern can sometimes be. To this day, I don’t know why the Murrumbidgee Brown Nymph was so emphatically effective that day – what it imitated or suggested to the fish? But as you can imagine I’ve fished it many times on Eucumbene since, and often effectively. In fact the fly has drifted from a river favourite to a lake favourite. While it still works beautifully on streams, particularly meadow streams and spring creeks, it’s provided some memorable days on lakes like Fyans, Hepburn and Tullaroop. Back in February, the Murrumbidgee Brown Nymph saved me from a blank on Woods Lake in Tasmania. The lake was super clear and under blue skies with little ripple, no one seemed to be catching anything, yet ‘old faithful’ delivered.

If it isn’t obvious already, let me be clear that I don’t regard myself as the originator of the Murrumbidgee Brown Nymph. Over time I’ve tweaked the pattern a little that was shown to me all those years back (and that’s now been faithfully recreated by Fulling Mill) but largely I’ve just passed it on.

Order Code Size
COA97012 12
COA97014 14

Group 12

Pheasant Tail - Gold Tungsten Bead

Pheasant Tail - Gold Tungsten Bead

One of the most popular nymph patterns in the world - now featuring a tungsten bead to help get your fly right down to feeding fish, fast!

Order Code Size
117812 12
117814 14
117816 16

Group 3

Sawyer's Pheasant Tail

Sawyer's Pheasant Tail

A best selling variation of the original, tied with a red head as a micro hot spot. Effective on both rivers and stillwaters.

Order Code Size
41112 12
41114 14
41116 16

Group 1

Seal's Fur Nymph - Black

Seal's Fur Nymph - Black

The Seals Fur nymph is a great all-round pattern that has been a worldwide favoutire for decades. Effective in both rivers and lakes, this pattern is a must-have for every angler.

Order Code Size
COA10210 10
COA10212 12
COA10214 14
COA10216 16

Group 12

Seal's Fur Nymph - Brown

Seal's Fur Nymph - Brown

The Seals Fur nymph is a great all-round pattern that has been a worldwide favoutire for decades. Effective in both rivers and lakes, this pattern is a must-have for every angler.

Order Code Size
COA10110 10
COA10112 12
COA10114 14
COA10116 16

Group 12

Seal's Fur Nymph - Olive

Seal's Fur Nymph - Olive

The Seals Fur nymph is a great all-round pattern that has been a worldwide favoutire for decades. Effective in both rivers and lakes, this pattern is a must-have for every angler.

Order Code Size
COA10310 10
COA10312 12
COA10314 14
COA10316 16

Group 12

Skinny Damsel

Skinny Damsel

This is a highly mobile pattern for when larger patterns don't get a response. Designed to imitate a damsel fly nymph, it is highly effective in stillwaters, especially when fished around weedbeds in the summer.

Order Code Size
254810 10

Group 1

 

Cristopher Bassano Australian Range Nymph Patterns

 

Bassano's Polaroiding Stick Caddis

Bassano's Polaroiding Stick Caddis

This fly was designed for sight fishing whether it be polaroiding or tailing fish. Almost every trout in Tasmania has a stick caddis in its stomach at all times. This fly sinks slowly which enables you to present the fly well ahead of a moving fish without spooking it. It was originally designed to be fished by itself on a leader of around twelve to fifteen feet. That is not to say it can’t be fished in a team of flies on the top dropper or in the middle. This fly works in every lake! Barbless.

Order Code Size
COA93814 14

Group 16

Bassano's Blind Caddis

Bassano's Blind Caddis

Barbless.

Order Code Size
COA97512 12

Group 16

Claret Nymph

Claret Nymph (Unweighted)

Claret has been my favourite colour for decades when mayflies are around. This nymph is my number one on Little Pine, Arthurs, Woods and Penstock. It needs to be fished very slowly or even static on a long leader. A slow figure of 8 retrieve is deadly. For me, this is a top dropper or point fly depending on the depth of water. Cast at a rising fish and given a "draw" past the fish, it is deadly. Be careful not to break fish off on the take as they can hit it very hard. I only ever fish this fly on a floating, intermediate or intermediate tip fly line. Barbless.

Order Code Size
COA95012 12
COA95014 14
COA95016 16

Group 16

Claret Nymph - Black Tungsten Bead

Claret Nymph - Black Tungsten Bead

The black tungsten beaded claret nymph is a point fly that I use in clear water or when the fish seem very fussy on bright days. It works very well using a slow figure of eight retrieve once left to sink to the desired depth (just above the weed!). It is also extremely effective fished static under a dry fly or indicator on Little Pine, Woods and Arthur's lakes.

Both the black and copper headed nymphs work very well on the rivers in smaller sizes such as 14 and 16. Either under a dry fly or in a team of nymphs fished upstream, they are deadly. If things are quiet, use the copper bead but if the water is low and clear late season, the black bead provides the subtlety you often need. Barbless.

Order Code Size
COA94812 12
COA94814 14
COA94816 16

Group 16

Claret Nymph - Copper Tungsten Bead

Claret Nymph - Copper Tungsten Bead

The copper tungsten beaded fly works best when there is a little colour in the water. Fished deep and slowly over weed beds, this fly also catches plenty of fish on the "hang" at the boat as it is drawn up and stopped. In a team of drab flies, this is often just what is needed to induce a take.

Both the black and copper headed nymphs work very well on the rivers in smaller sizes such as 14 and 16. Either under a dry fly or in a team of nymphs fished upstream, they are deadly. If things are quiet, use the copper bead but if the water is low and clear late season, the black bead provides the subtlety you often need. Barbless.

Order Code Size
COA94912 12
COA94914 14
COA94916 16

Group 16

Possum / Hare's Ear Nymph

Possum / Hare's Ear Nymph

This is a top dropper fly when fish are feeding on mayfly duns or nymphs. Wherever mayflies are present, this is a great fly. It sinks slowly and represents the lighter coloured nymph very well. This fly should be fished in a team as per the Claret Nymph and at least nine feet from the end of your fly line as the top dropper. Barbless.

Order Code Size
COA94714 14
COA94716 16

Group 16

 

Bill Beck Australian Range Nymph Patterns

 

Beck's Stick Caddis

Beck's Stick Caddis

My best catcher of tailing fish but effective in any lake situation. Usually fished on short dropper under a Guide Tag. Use a floating fly line.

Order Code Size
COA93614 14

Group 12

Krystal Flash Nymph

Krystal Flash Nymph

For the last few seasons this fly has taken the most fish of any pattern used. Normally fished 3ft under a big indicator fly like the Brown Wulff with a fluorocarbon dropper. This fly appears to imitate the sub surface mayfly nymph during its emerging phase and is as effective during a hatch as before.  Fished best with a floating fly line. If fishing by itself try a very slow figure 8 retrieve, just keeping in contact with fly.

Order Code Size
COA93014 14

Group 12